Stormwater Program

Union Sanitary District (USD) has entered into a unique contractual partnership with the City of Fremont in which USD provides the expertise to fulfill several elements of the City's federally mandated Urban Runoff-Storm Water Program. This agreement allows USD to act as a representative of the City of Fremont during inspections of commercial/industrial/residential facilities for compliance with the City of Fremont's Storm Water Management Plan (Municipal Ordinance 2012) and to initiate enforcement actions against violators when warranted. However, the main goal of this partnership is to protect our creeks and bay by educating the business and public sectors about discharges, storage or practices which lead to illegal discharges to our storm drains/creeks and promoting and achieving voluntary compliance.

Why Worry About Stormwater? 

When it rains, the water that runs along the gutters on your street seems to disappear down the storm drains. But have you ever wondered where the water goes from there? It does not go to a wastewater treatment plant, so no pollution is removed from the water. This rain water, or polluted runoff (people pollution), comes from things we do every day. Anything you dump or drop on the ground adds to polluted runoff. Anything that enters the stormwater system is discharged untreated into the waterways which impacts your watershed.

What is a watershed?

Everyone lives in a watershed. You know your county and city, but do you know your watershed address?

Unlike states and counties, watersheds have natural boundaries defined by the shape of the land and the flow of water. In basic terms, a watershed, or basin, is all the land that drains to the same body of water, such as a lake or river. Smaller watersheds become part of larger watersheds, as streams feed into rivers, and rivers flow into oceans. This means wherever you are and wherever you go, you’re in a watershed.

Why should you care?

You are a citizen of a watershed. Your health and the health of your watershed are inseparable. This is because a watershed is an interconnected system of land, water, air, and the life they support—including people and cities. Your everyday actions affect your watershed. When a watershed is unhealthy, everything living in it suffers. The symptoms are easy to see: Beaches are closed because of pollutants. Fish populations dwindle because there isn’t enough water or the quality is too poor to support them. Air pollution endangers our health and damages soil, water, crops, forests, and wildlife. A polluted watershed puts our drinking water supplies at risk. Our food sources are affected. Contaminated shellfish are unsafe to eat. Toxic chemicals in fish can accumulate in our bodies. Your watershed’s health can directly impact you and your family’s health.

For more information on other businesses and types of activities please see the link for Alameda County Clean Water Program. Anyone interested in having a charity or fundraising carwash event should contact their local City for conditions and approval of your event to prevent stormwater violations.

Links to some general types of facilities for relevant Best Management Practices handouts.

General Business

Residents stormwater resource page

 

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